High Satisfaction with Family Planning Health Education Among Women of Reproductive Age in Tanzania: An Exit Survey

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  •   Evelyne W. Lutainulwa

  •   Larry O. Akoko

  •   Amani Anaeli

Abstract

Background: Reproductive and child health clinic attendance is vital in offering family planning health education among women of reproductive age in Tanzania. During these visits, group education sessions on modern contraception is offered to women before receiving the specific services they went for. Those who show interest with modern contraception proceed to individualized sessions on adopting one of the methods. Therefore, being satisfied during the group session is paramount to adopting modern contraception. This study therefore sought to assess the level of client satisfaction with the family planning health education among women of reproductive age from selected clinics in Dar es Salaam.


Methodology: This was an observational study conducted in selected Reproductive Health clinics in three municipalities within Dar es Salaam region. Facilities were grouped by districts and ownership from which one third were systematically picked to provide 8 participants each. Interviewer led completion of the study tool was employed to assess satisfaction parameters. Analysis on satisfaction was all or none from a 5-point rating scale and association calculated with significance set at a p-value of less than 5% and 95% confidence interval.


Results: There was a general higher satisfaction with the family health education offered during the visit period. Satisfaction with family planning health education was significantly higher among women with higher parity (p=0.009), employed (p=0.00001), and were attended to by a clinician (p=0.0006). A significant disparity within municipalities was also noted (p=0.005). Private facilities, shorter time in facilities, and non-cash payments did not significantly influence satisfaction.


Conclusion: Family planning health education satisfaction is high among women of the reproductive age group in Dar es Salaam clinics. We need to explore how this satisfaction is translated to reduce the unmet needs for modern contraception in Tanzania. Furthermore, whether this high satisfaction translates into good knowledge remains unexplored.


Keywords: Family Planning, Health education, modern contraception, satisfaction

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How to Cite
Lutainulwa, E. W., Akoko, L. O., & Anaeli, A. (2021). High Satisfaction with Family Planning Health Education Among Women of Reproductive Age in Tanzania: An Exit Survey. European Journal of Medical and Health Sciences, 3(1), 171-175. https://doi.org/10.24018/ejmed.2021.3.1.712