Unexplained Increase in Death Rate during COVID19 Pandemic Mistakenly Attributed to Malaria

##plugins.themes.bootstrap3.article.main##

  •   Ibrahim Abdelrhim Ali

  •   Alaaeldeen Mohammed Ahmed Abdeldafia

  •   Abrar Bakry Elmalik

  •   Mohamed Eltayieb Elawad

Abstract

Background: Since the emergence of COVID-19 pandemic, the world has faced many challenges. In Sudan, Gizera state has shown mysterious symptoms to the residents of a village and has been diagnosed with malaria.


Aim: The study was aimed to disprove the diagnosis of malaria, and to find another more convincing explanation that fits with the general features of the disease.


Method: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using an electronic questionnaire designed by Google form.


Result: The respondents was 402, the distribution of males and females was 51.7% and 48.3%, respectively. 83% were suffered the symptoms in May and June. The most common symptoms were headache, fever, fatigue and joint pain, back pain, sore throat and anosmia, at 60.7%, 49.8%, 47.3%, 33.3%, 37.3%, and 23.3%, respectively. 61.4% seeked health care, 99.9% performed peripheral blood film for malaria and 83% were positive. 77% of those with positive result, 72% of those with negative results, 62% of those who did not seek health care suffered similar symptoms, mainly headache. Also, anosmia is 30%, and 25% for those who have seeked and have not seeked health care, respectively. The recovery period was less than a week in 49% of those with positive results, 57% of those with negative results, and 63% of those who did not seek health care. It was more than two weeks in 9%, 12%, and 4% in the positive, negative, and uncaring, respectively. 56.5% did not notice the mosquitoes in that period, 31% and 11.7% noticed that and did not know, respectively.


Conclusion: The most likely diagnosis of these mysterious symptoms is COVID-19.


Keywords: COVID-19, malaria, Gizera state, Sudan

References

Sohrabi C, Alsafi Z, O’Neill N, Khan M, Kerwan A, Al-Jabir A, Iosifidis C, Agha R. World Health Organization declares global emergency: A review of the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19). International Journal of Surgery. 2020 Feb 26.

World Health Organization. Coronavirus disease 2019 (‎COVID-19)‎: situation report, 88.

Onder G, Rezza G, Brusaferro S. Case-fatality rate and characteristics of patients dying in relation to COVID-19 in Italy. Jama. 2020 May 12;323(18):1775-6.

Kraemer MU, Yang CH, Gutierrez B, Wu CH, Klein B, Pigott DM, Du Plessis L, Faria NR, Li R, Hanage WP, Brownstein JS. The effect of human mobility and control measures on the COVID-19 epidemic in China. Science. 2020 May 1;368(6490):493-7.

Flaxman S, Mishra S, Gandy A, Unwin HJ, Mellan TA, Coupland H, Whittaker C, Zhu H, Berah T, Eaton JW, Monod M. Estimating the effects of non-pharmaceutical interventions on COVID-19 in Europe. Nature. 2020 Aug;584(7820):257-61.

Joob B, Wiwanitkit V. COVID-19 can present with a rash and be mistaken for Dengue. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2020 May;82(5): e177.

Nicola M, Alsafi Z, Sohrabi C, Kerwan A, Al-Jabir A, Iosifidis C, Agha M, Agha R. The socio-economic implications of the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19): A review. International journal of surgery (London, England). 2020 Jun; 78:185.

Guan WJ, Liang WH, Zhao Y, Liang HR, Chen ZS, Li YM, Liu XQ, Chen RC, Tang CL, Wang T, Ou CQ. Comorbidity and its impact on 1590 patients with Covid-19 in China: A Nationwide Analysis. European Respiratory Journal. 2020 May 1;55(5).

Yang J, Zheng Y, Gou X, Pu K, Chen Z, Guo Q, Ji R, Wang H, Wang Y, Zhou Y. Prevalence of comorbidities in the novel Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis. International journal of infectious diseases. 2020 Mar 12.

Li LQ, Huang T, Wang YQ, Wang ZP, Liang Y, Huang TB, Zhang HY, Sun W, Wang Y. COVID‐19 patients' clinical characteristics, discharge rate, and fatality rate of meta‐analysis. Journal of medical virology. 2020 Jun;92(6):577-83.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

##plugins.themes.bootstrap3.article.details##

How to Cite
Ali, I. A., Abdeldafia, A. M. A., Elmalik, A. B., & Elawad, M. E. (2020). Unexplained Increase in Death Rate during COVID19 Pandemic Mistakenly Attributed to Malaria. European Journal of Medical and Health Sciences, 2(6). https://doi.org/10.24018/ejmed.2020.2.6.545