Perinatal Anxiety and Depression (PAD) on COVID-19

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  •   I. Made Darmayasa

  •   I. Ketut Sumarda

  •   Ida Ayu Kusuma Wardani

  •   Ni Ketut Sri Diniari

Abstract

Pregnancy is a complex and dynamic experience where women undergo significant physiological and psychological changes. These changes can cause an increased risk of developing anxiety and depression in perinatal women. Depression usually starts during pregnancy or gets worse after delivery. These changes and uncertainties can cause fear, anxiety, and depression symptoms in women who may have experienced perinatal anxiety and depression, even in women with low risk. The fear of infectious disease or the potential effect that may harm the fetus or the newborn baby will cause harm and depression in this population. Four pregnant and postpartum women diagnosed with COVID-19 in this case series experienced perinatal anxiety and depression, major depression, and adjustment disorder with mixed reactions of anxiety and depression. Patients are given pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapy. The pharmacological therapy was antidepressants and anti-anxiety, while the non-pharmacological therapy was given as supportive psychotherapy, relaxation therapy, and family psychoeducation. During the COVID-19 pandemic, psychotherapy was carried out using the telehealth method.


Keywords: COVID-19, perinatal anxiety and depression, telehealth

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