Obstetric Safety and Quality at Istishari Arab Hospital: Where Are We Now and How Can We Improve

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  •   Raneem Abd Alrhim

  •   Shahenaz Najjar

  •   Sami Smerat

Abstract


Background: Indicators for tracking progress in maternal and newborn health have been recommended by a number of global monitoring initiatives. Quality of care is increasingly recognized as an important aspect of maternal and newborn health, particularly in the labor and delivery and immediate postnatal period.




Objectives: The purpose of this study is to estimate the frequency of obstetric complications. Furthermore, in 2018, Istishari Arab Hospital assessed the safety and quality of obstetrical procedures. Identifying risk factors that contributed to adverse events in the obstetric department.




Methods: A retrospective study is dependent on the use of electronic medical records from inpatient hospitals. Research was conducted in the field of inquiry in an electronic database, as well as related studies. Maternal morbidity and adverse outcomes were identified using diagnosis and procedure codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10-CM) within the health information system. Aside from the paper files. SPSS was used for descriptive, univariate, and multivariate analysis.




Results This study included 418 women, with 62.2 percent of them having their babies delivered by CS. The average age of the women in this study was 27.84.8 years, with 58.1 percent of them coming from Ramallah. Following a multivariate analysis using logistic regression, our study discovered a positive correlation with P-value 0.05 between educational level and prior CS on one side and surgical site infection on the other. Furthermore, our study found a link between the rate of CS on one side and maternal age, diabetes, hypertension, and gynecological factors on the other (prematurity, multiple gestation).




Conclusion: Regardless of the number, patients with a lower education level or a history of CS have a higher risk of surgical site infection and other complications. By focusing on these factors and increasing awareness and education, we may be able to reduce obstetric complications in the future.



Keywords: Cesarean section, Istishari Arab Hospital, obstetric, Palestine, surgical site infection

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How to Cite
Alrhim, R. A., Najjar, S., & Smerat, S. (2022). Obstetric Safety and Quality at Istishari Arab Hospital: Where Are We Now and How Can We Improve. European Journal of Medical and Health Sciences, 4(1), 33–40. https://doi.org/10.24018/ejmed.2022.4.1.1081

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